Shipper is responsible for Placard placement.  Consignee is responsible for placard removal when container is emptied.  We need a clear copy of Declaration of Dangerous Goods, Ocean Bill of Lading and Container must be properly placarded prior to pickup.  For guidance on proper shipping papers click here.

  • EXPLOSIVES - CLASS 1.4, 1.5, 1.6

  • FLAMMABLE GAS - CLASS 2.1 (NO BULK QTY)

  • NON-FLAMMABLE GAS - CLASS 2.2 (NO BULK QTY)

  • FLAMMABLE - CLASS 3

  • COMBUSTIBLE

  • FLAMMABLE SOLID - CLASS 4.1

  • SPONTANEOUSLY COMBUSTIBLE - CLASS 4.2

  • OXIDIZER - CLASS 5.1

  • ORGANIC PEROXIDE (other than organic peroxide, Type B, liquid or solid, temperature controlled) - CLASS 5.1

  • POISON (other than material poisonous by inhalation) - CLASS 6.1 - Only Packing Groups II and III

  • CORROSIVE - CLASS 8

  • CLASS 9

  • ORM-D

Unapproved Hazard Classes

  • EXPLOSIVES - CLASS 1.1, 1.2, 1.3

  • POISON GAS - CLASS 2.3

  • DANGEROUS WHEN WET - CLASS 4.3

  • ORGANIC PEROXIDE (ORGANIC PEROXIDE, TYPE B, LIQUID OR SOLID, TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED) - CLASS 5.2

  • POISON INHALATION HAZARD - CLASS 6.1

  • RADIOACTIVE - CLASS 7

Civil penalties are assessed for knowingly violating a hazardous material transportation law or a regulation, order, special permit, or approval issued under that law. The following updated civil penalties apply to violations occurring on or after October 1, 2012: 

The maximum civil penalty is increased from $55,000 to $75,000 for knowingly violating federal hazardous material transportation law.

The maximum civil penalty for knowingly violating laws and regulations that result in death, serious illness, severe injury to any person, or substantial destruction of property is increased from $110,000 to $175,000.

The $250 minimum civil penalty has been eliminated.

The civil penalty for violations related to training has reverted to $450.

"Hazmat safety regulations exist to keep people, property and the environment safe, and it is our responsibility to enforce these laws," said PHMSA administrator Cynthia Quarterman. "When someone breaks the rules, it puts us all at risk. The consequences for doing so should be substantial enough to discourage misconduct."